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Understanding the delay in ACA employer mandate

You’ve no doubt heard about the one-year delay in the Affordable Care Act employer mandate. I thought it might be useful to share the answers to a few questions we’ve been hearing from our customers since the big news.

Who benefits?

Business owners, for sure. Obama administration officials say they listened to businesses that complained they needed to figure out how to comply with complicated new rules written since the plan became law. And the delay buys time for the government, as well, to improve and simplify the rules.

The ACA required employers with more than 50 employees working 30 or more hours a week to offer them suitable health coverage or pay a fine. What’s changed is the deadline for that requirement, which was to begin in January. The new deadline is Jan. 1, 2015. One very important thing to remember: The delay does not absolve an employee’s responsibility to get health insurance.

Who else benefits from the delay?

  • Some low-income workers. When the employer mandate does take effect, some smallish companies have threatened to lay off workers or cut back their hours to stay under the 50-employee threshold. There’s debate about how many workers might be harmed by this.
  • Some job hunters. Once the mandate kicks in, job-seekers may find fewer openings for unskilled workers. That’s because some restaurants and other small companies say the mandate will force them to cut back on staff or freeze hiring. The economy is likely to continue improving, which will help offset the impact by increasing demand for workers.

Who loses?

  • Uninsured people who already are confused about the law. The law doesn’t change the January 2014 deadline for individuals to get insurance or the tax credits in the law to help them pay for it. But many people don’t understand how the law works or when it takes effect, and the delay for the employer mandate may further muddle the issue for many.
  • Some workers. Those whose employers might add insurance coverage to avoid the law’s penalties will have to wait a year. But this group is expected to be small. The penalties are designed more to discourage businesses from dropping their existing health plans than to encourage them to start new ones. And these employees can buy their own insurance through the new health care exchanges being set up under the law.

About the Author


Lon Matejczyk

Lon is the former publisher of the Colorado Springs Business Journal and Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group.He has served in leadership roles at various newspapers in Iowa, Florida and Wisconsin. Lon received his Bachelor of Arts in Communications from the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire and attended the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. Earlier in his career, Lon spent several years as a sea captain and held a 100-ton Coast Guard license. Lon is a former rugby player, referee and administrator and now coaches under 13 year old kids. Lon has served on the boards of numerous community and business organizations including Colorado Springs Leadership Institute, Peak Venture Group, CS Quality of Life Indicators Business Index Committee, Junior Achievement and is a member of The Colorado Thirty Group.  Lon was given the “Making the Pikes Peak region a better place to live work and play” award by the CS Chamber of Commerce, was the VFW Post 1’s business citizen of the year.

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